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5th Annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17

Join us for our 5th annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17, 2019, in Washington, D.C. This unique two-day conference brings together diverse housing, health, and education stakeholders to explore innovative system alignment efforts and develop cross-sector solutions to complex challenges all three sectors face.

Learn More & Register
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Register Now: 2019 Housing Is Summit

CLPHA is pleased to announce that renowned physician, epidemiologist, researcher, and activist Dr. Camara Jones will be a keynote speaker at our fifth annual Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., May 16-17. Dr. Jones will present on the need to address social determinants of health to reduce health disparities as well as the interdisciplinary nature of a strong safety net.

Register Today
 
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News Article
Community:
Mar 7, 2019
Democrats this week announced new legislation that would slash child poverty by paying low-income parents the kind of monthly allowance that is standard in other developed countries. But the lawmakers who introduced the bill, called the American Family Act, didn’t use the terms “child benefit” or “child allowance” at their Capitol Hill press conference Wednesday. Instead, they all called it a tax credit or a tax cut.

Authored by: Arthur Delaney for HuffPost
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 12, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 28, 2019
Child poverty in the U.S. could be cut in half over the next 10 years with a few simple steps, according to a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. The cost would be high — at least $90 billion a year. But the National Academies report warns that the price of not doing anything would be far greater.

Authored by: Pam Fessler for NPR
Topics: Child welfare, Criminal justice, Early childhood, Education, Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 12, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 5, 2019
We beef up law enforcement to attack crime, devote more funding to try and improve inadequate schools and tackle health disparities by getting more people to the doctor. But what if Baltimore could solve all of its persistent social problems by getting rid of poverty?

Authored by: Baltimore Sun Editorial Board for The Baltimore Sun
Topics: Asset building, Criminal justice, Funding, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mental health
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019

What if we just focused on poverty to solve the city's issues?

News Article
Feb 5, 2019
Baltimore Sun Editorial Board for The Baltimore Sun
We beef up law enforcement to attack crime, devote more funding to try and improve inadequate schools and tackle health disparities by getting more people to the doctor. But what if Baltimore could solve all of its persistent social problems by getting rid of poverty?
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Research
Community:
Jul 21, 2018
A new study measured the mental health of Philadelphia residents before and after blighted lots had been converted into green spaces.

Authored by: Melissa Breyer for treehugger
Topics: Community development, Health, Mental health, Place-based, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019
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Report
Community:
These Principles are derived from a thematic review of mission statements and principles from 35 organizations representing the community development, health, academic, government, finance, and philanthropic sectors. More than 200 respondents provided over 1,800 comments which helped refine the Principles below.

Authored by: Build Healthy Places Network
Topics: Community development, Health, Housing, Partnerships, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019
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Report
Community:
Healthy Housing for All: How Affordable Housing is Leading the Way explores the affordable housing industry’s achievements in creating healthier housing environments and translates them into lessons for the broader housing marketplace. The innovations in healthy affordable housing present an opportunity to replicate healthy housing successes, as well as to respond to market demand across the residential development industry.

Authored by: Urban Land Institute
Topics: Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Oct 1, 2018
When children get sick from poor living conditions inside their rundown apartments, they miss school. And when 95 percent of students of one school live in the same apartment complex—where evictions are routine and black mold is rampant—classrooms are often left empty.

Authored by: Jamie Hwang for the American Bar Association Journal
Topics: Attendance, Child welfare, Education, Health, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Place-based, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019

Atlanta pro bono proram expands to resolve elementary school students' housing issues

News Article
Oct 1, 2018
Jamie Hwang for the American Bar Association Journal
When children get sick from poor living conditions inside their rundown apartments, they miss school. And when 95 percent of students of one school live in the same apartment complex—where evictions are routine and black mold is rampant—classrooms are often left empty.
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Publication
Community:
Jan 25, 2019
As a result of decades of legalized discrimination in the housing industry, huge racial disparities in homeownership still exist today. This is not acceptable in a country founded on equal opportunity. Nationally, 72 percent of white households own a home, compared to only 42 percent of black households and 46 percent of Hispanic households. Homes typically make up the largest portion of a family’s overall wealth, so these disparities in homeownership are the most significant factor in the racial wealth gap.

Authored by: Kevin Campbell for Habitat for Humanity of Wake County
Topics: Asset building, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 22, 2019
In 2016, the health system teamed with Spartanburg Community College and the National Center for Construction Education and Research, a nonprofit that provides global training and certification. Together, the three entities began offering construction skills training to area residents.

Authored by: Alan Jenkins and Melinda Young for Discover Health
Topics: Asset building, Health, Low-income, Partnerships, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019

Building a Community

News Article
Jan 22, 2019
Alan Jenkins and Melinda Young for Discover Health
In 2016, the health system teamed with Spartanburg Community College and the National Center for Construction Education and Research, a nonprofit that provides global training and certification. Together, the three entities began offering construction skills training to area residents.
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Publication
Community:
Feb 25, 2019
Why would a healthcare system get involved in the issue of affordable housing? Or play a critical role in establishing an affordable, high-quality preschool? That’s exactly what AdventHealth is doing in a partnership with the residents of the Communities of West Lakes in Orlando. They are just one of several healthcare industry partners investing in this neighborhood that houses some of their most frequent customers.

Authored by: Dr. Douglas P. Jutte and Carol Naughton for Purpose Built Communities
Topics: Health, Housing, Partnerships
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019

Can the Healthcare Industry Make Communities Healthy?

Publication
Feb 25, 2019
Dr. Douglas P. Jutte and Carol Naughton for Purpose Built Communities
Why would a healthcare system get involved in the issue of affordable housing? Or play a critical role in establishing an affordable, high-quality preschool? That’s exactly what AdventHealth is doing in a partnership with the residents of the Communities of West Lakes in Orlando.
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News Article
Community:
Mar 11, 2019
The housing crisis has given rise to acronyms which define the battle over new developments: "Yes in My Backyard" (YIMBYs) vs. “Not In My Backyard" (NIMBYs). And now there's a new acronym: PHIMBY, as in "Public Housing in My Backyard."

Authored by: Jessica Placzek for KQED
Topics: Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 28, 2019
Over the past decade, the real estate fortunes for African Americans have reversed course. Despite a strengthening economy, including record low unemployment and higher wages for black workers, homeownership levels for that group have dropped incrementally almost every year since 2004. It fell to 43 percent in 2017, virtually erasing all of the gains made since the passage of the Fair Housing Act in 1968, landmark legislation outlawing housing discrimination.

Authored by: Troy McMullen for The Washington Post
Topics: Asset building, Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019

The 'heartbreaking' decrease in black homeownership

News Article
Feb 28, 2019
Troy McMullen for The Washington Post
Over the past decade, the real estate fortunes for African Americans have reversed course. Despite a strengthening economy, including record low unemployment and higher wages for black workers, homeownership levels for that group have dropped incrementally almost every year since 2004.
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News Article
Community:
Mar 6, 2019
Fort Worth’s work finding housing solutions for those facing homelessness can serve as a model for the rest of the country, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson said Wednesday during a stop in Cowtown, one of several planned in Texas.

Authored by: Luke Ranker for Fort Worth Star-Telegram
Topics: Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Partnerships, South
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 11, 2019

Fort Worth is a model for the country, HUD Secretary Ben Carson says. Here's why

News Article
Mar 6, 2019
Luke Ranker for Fort Worth Star-Telegram
Fort Worth’s work finding housing solutions for those facing homelessness can serve as a model for the rest of the country, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson said Wednesday during a stop in Cowtown, one of several planned in Texas.
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News Article
Community:
Mar 8, 2019
Typhus, tuberculosis, and other illnesses are spreading quickly through camps and shelters.

Authored by: Anna Gorman and Kaiser Health News for The Atlantic
Topics: Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 8, 2019
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Research
Community:
Mar 8, 2019
The number of kids enrolled in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) — two government health plans for the poor — fell by nearly 600,000 in the first 11 months of 2018, a precipitous drop that has puzzled and alarmed many health policy analysts, while several states say it reflects the good news of an improving economy.

Authored by: Michael Ollove for The Pew Charitable Trusts
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Child welfare, Early childhood, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 8, 2019

Child Enrollment in Public Health Programs Fell by 600K Last Year

Research
Mar 8, 2019
Michael Ollove for The Pew Charitable Trusts
The number of kids enrolled in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) — two government health plans for the poor — fell by nearly 600,000 in the first 11 months of 2018, a precipitous drop that has puzzled and alarmed many health policy analysts, while several states say it refl
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Podcast
Community:
One out of every 10 young people between the ages of 16 and 24 is neither working nor in school. These “disconnected” young people face an uphill battle finding work and are at risk of economic hardship well into adulthood. Although there are many programs that aim to reconnect young people to education and employment, findings from evaluations of these programs have been mixed. The evidence base has grown substantially in the past several months, though, as studies of three pro­grams — YouthBuild, Year Up, and New York City’s Young Adult Internship Program (YAIP) — have released new findings. MDRC’s Dan Bloom and Cynthia Miller recently wrote a brief that discusses findings from the new studies and their implications for youth programs.

Authored by: MDRC
Topics: Asset building, Low-income, Mobility, Research, Workforce development, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 8, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Mar 6, 2019
Type the phrase “aging in place” into a Google search, and you’ll likely see pictures of wheelchairs fitting comfortably through home doorways, bathtubs and showers with zero-step entrances, and open floorplans to facilitate seamless movement from room to room. But what is often missed in discussions promoting aging in place is that increasing livability doesn’t just mean adapting a home’s physical characteristics, it also means ensuring a range of cost options and housing types in a single community.

Authored by: Martha Fedorowicz for How Housing Matters
Topics: Disabilities, Health, Housing, Place-based, Seniors
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 7, 2019

How to Promote Aging in Place (Hint: It's More Than Wheelchair Accessibility)

Publication
Mar 6, 2019
Martha Fedorowicz for How Housing Matters
Type the phrase “aging in place” into a Google search, and you’ll likely see pictures of wheelchairs fitting comfortably through home doorways, bathtubs and showers with zero-step entrances, and open floorplans to facilitate seamless movement from room to room.
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Research
Community:
Nov 22, 2018
Improved access to health insurance contributed to reducing worry and stress associated with paying rent/mortgage or purchasing meals among low-income people. Expanding health insurance access may have contributed to increasing the disposable income of low income groups.

Authored by: Shiho Kino, Koryu Sato, and Iciro Kawachi for International Journal for Equity in Health
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Health, Housing, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Mental health, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 7, 2019

Spillover benefit of improved access to healthcare on reducing worry about housing and meal affordability

Research
Nov 22, 2018
Shiho Kino, Koryu Sato, and Iciro Kawachi for International Journal for Equity in Health
Improved access to health insurance contributed to reducing worry and stress associated with paying rent/mortgage or purchasing meals among low-income people. Expanding health insurance access may have contributed to increasing the disposable income of low income groups.
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News Article
Community:
Mar 1, 2019
Residents of a South Carolina public housing complex are demanding answers after two of their neighbors died from the gas.

Authored by: Suzy Khimm and Laura Strickler for NBC News
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 7, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 5, 2019
If rent-control measures pass in all of the states and cities where they're currently on the table, nearly a third of all renter households in the United States could secure relief.

Authored by: Sophie Kasakove for Pacific Standard
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 7, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 5, 2019
Disasters are becoming more common in America. In the early and mid-20th century, fewer than 20 percent of U.S. counties experienced a disaster each year. Today, it's about 50 percent. According to the 2018 National Climate Assessment, climate change is already driving more severe droughts, floods and wildfires in the U.S. And those disasters are expensive. The federal government spends billions of dollars annually helping communities rebuild and prevent future damage. But an NPR investigation has found that across the country, white Americans and those with more wealth often receive more federal dollars after a disaster than do minorities and those with less wealth. Federal aid isn't necessarily allocated to those who need it most; it's allocated according to cost-benefit calculations meant to minimize taxpayer risk.

Authored by: Rebecca Hersher and Robert Benincasa for NPR
Topics: Community development, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Mar 7, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Mar 5, 2019
In a recently published report called “A Roadmap to Reducing Child Poverty” from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, its co-authors suggest policy changes that they claim could cut child poverty in half in just 10 years.

Authored by: Rhonda Fanning and Michael Marks for Texas Standard
Topics: Child welfare, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 7, 2019

New Policy Recommendations Aim To Reduce Child Poverty By Half, Within 10 Years

News Article
Mar 5, 2019
Rhonda Fanning and Michael Marks for Texas Standard
In a recently published report called “A Roadmap to Reducing Child Poverty” from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, its co-authors suggest policy changes that they claim could cut child poverty in half in just 10 years.
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Webinar
Community:
Feb 28, 2019
Join us for an examination of how cross-sector data sharing initiatives are being used to tackle tough public health problems. The webinar will provide an in-depth look at a cross-sector collaboration in Illinois between public health, law enforcement, emergency medical services, a fire department and a jail aimed at addressing the needs of high utilizers of behavioral health services.

Authored by: The Network for Public Health Law
Topics: Criminal justice, Data sharing, Health, Mental health, Midwest, Partnerships, Safety, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 6, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Education Leads Home’s State Partnerships on Student Homelessness Project brings together policymakers and practitioners from with the goal of overcoming child and youth homelessness through education. Through the partnership, each state is committed to researching and implementing replicable best practices that address the most urgent needs of their unique homeless student populations. The State Partnerships on Student Homelessness Project is a nonpartisan effort to develop best practices that can be replicated by communities and states nationwide. In its inaugural year of the project, Education Leads Home (ELH) awarded six states – California, Kentucky, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington – small grants through a competitive process. ELH will provide ongoing technical assistance.

Authored by: Education Leads Home
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 5, 2019
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Publication
Community:
The California Homeless Youth Project (HYP) is a research and policy initiative that highlights the issues and challenges faced by unaccompanied young people who are homeless or lack stable housing. This website provides state and local policymakers and others with information and policy resources specific to unaccompanied homeless youth, with a focus on young people in California.

Authored by: CA.gov
Topics: Education, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Mar 5, 2019