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5th Annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17

Join us for our 5th annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17, 2019, in Washington, D.C. This unique two-day conference brings together diverse housing, health, and education stakeholders to explore innovative system alignment efforts and develop cross-sector solutions to complex challenges all three sectors face.

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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Register Now: 2019 Housing Is Summit

CLPHA is pleased to announce that renowned physician, epidemiologist, researcher, and activist Dr. Camara Jones will be a keynote speaker at our fifth annual Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., May 16-17. Dr. Jones will present on the need to address social determinants of health to reduce health disparities as well as the interdisciplinary nature of a strong safety net.

Register Today
 
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Community:
Jan 7, 2019
When the school day ends, far too many children return home to empty refrigerators and bare cupboards. The federal Afterschool Nutrition Programs provide healthy meals and snacks to children to ensure they are fed after school (and on weekends and during school holidays). According to FRAC’s latest Afterschool Suppers: A Snapshot of Participation report, the District of Columbia had the highest participation in the nation of children in the Afterschool Supper Program, with a 31.6 percent increase in participation between October 2016 and October 2017.

Authored by: Paige Pokorney for Food Research and Action Center (FRAC)
Topics: Child welfare, East Coast, Education, Food insecurity, Health, Low-income, Nutrition, Out-of-school time
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 16, 2019

Expanding the Reach of Afterschool Meals in the Nation's Capital

Report
Jan 7, 2019
Paige Pokorney for Food Research and Action Center (FRAC)
When the school day ends, far too many children return home to empty refrigerators and bare cupboards. The federal Afterschool Nutrition Programs provide healthy meals and snacks to children to ensure they are fed after school (and on weekends and during school holidays).
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News Article
Community:
Jan 8, 2019
Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey on Tuesday announced $3 million in grants to 13 community organizations that address things like housing, hunger and other societal factors that affect someone’s health.

Authored by: Shira Schoenberg for Mass Live
Topics: East Coast, Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Low-income, Nutrition, Partnerships, Preventative care
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 16, 2019

Massachusetts AG Maura Healey gives $3 million to address social factors that affect health

News Article
Jan 8, 2019
Shira Schoenberg for Mass Live
Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey on Tuesday announced $3 million in grants to 13 community organizations that address things like housing, hunger and other societal factors that affect someone’s health.
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News Article
Community:
Jan 6, 2019
These programs, available at 10 Wichita middle and high schools so far, include extended serving times in cafeterias, grab-and-go breakfasts from carts or kiosks, and “second-chance breakfast,” in which students are offered breakfast after homeroom or first period.

Authored by: Suzanne Perez Tobias for The Wichita Eagle
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Food insecurity, Health, Low-income, Midwest, Nutrition, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 16, 2019

Lots of kids start the school day hungry. Here's how Wichita is trying to help

News Article
Jan 6, 2019
Suzanne Perez Tobias for The Wichita Eagle
These programs, available at 10 Wichita middle and high schools so far, include extended serving times in cafeterias, grab-and-go breakfasts from carts or kiosks, and “second-chance breakfast,” in which students are offered breakfast after homeroom or first period.
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News Article
Community:
Jan 10, 2019
The federally funded School Breakfast Program is critical to addressing childhood hunger and food insecurity. While most schools participate in the program, many students are reluctant to eat breakfast in the cafeteria before school starts — the traditional service delivery model for school breakfast. To combat this, four of the top organizations in education, food insecurity and school nutrition came together to form Partners for Breakfast in the Classroom, with the support of the Walmart Foundation. The Partners, which include FRAC, the School Nutrition Foundation, the NEA Foundation and the National Association of Elementary School Principals, are working to address barriers to school breakfast consumption through an innovative solution: serving breakfast in the classroom.

Authored by: Etienne Melcher Pilbin for Medium
Topics: Child welfare, Education, Food insecurity, Health, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 16, 2019
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Community:
Jan 10, 2019
There isn't federal data on food insecurity among college students nationally, so the GAO reviewed 31 studies on the topic, showing that most concluded that over a third of college students don't always have enough to eat.

Authored by: Elissa Nadworny and Clare Lombardo for NPR
Topics: Education, Food insecurity, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Post-secondary, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 16, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 8, 2019
SNAP is the first line of defense against senior hunger and frees up funds for health care and housing. This is important because one way struggling seniors often meet rising health care and other costs is by cutting back on or skipping meals — coping strategies that can exacerbate existing health problems. SNAP improves the health and well-being of seniors by reducing the negative health impacts of food insecurity, including diabetes, hypertension and depression.

Authored by: Joey Hentzler for The Topeka Capital-Journal
Topics: Depression, Disabilities, Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Midwest, Nutrition, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 16, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Oct 9, 2018
Women with children, especially, stay hidden in fear of losing custody of their children. As a result, we will never see them camping in tents or in downtown parks.

Authored by: Mary Ellen Mitchell for SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Safety, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 11, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Jan 11, 2019
This short article expands on the press release issued last month by six national organizations. It explains why HUD’s data are so contentious, and why other data sources provide a more accurate picture of children, youth, and family homelessness.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Metrics, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 11, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 10, 2019
Island School is one of 247 “community schools” in New York. These are regular public schools, with a twist. They have longer days and longer school years: Island stays open 12 hours a day, six days a week, including spring and winter breaks as well as the summer. A psychologist makes weekly rounds. A dentist comes by regularly. So does an optometrist, and students who need glasses get them free.

Authored by: David L. Kirk for The New York Times
Topics: Community development, Dual-generation, East Coast, Education, Family engagement, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Metrics, Partnerships, Stability, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 10, 2019
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Report
Community:
Jan 9, 2019
In 2018, communities across the country faced a continuing housing affordability crisis—and, in some places, natural disasters—that strained the ability of local actors to address homelessness. After declining for almost a decade, the number of people experiencing homelessness in the United States increased for the second year in a row.

Authored by: Oriya Cohen for How Housing Matters
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 10, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 7, 2019
Kansas officials see a solution to chronic homelessness and the burden placed on state institutions, jails and law enforcement in the work of a psychiatrist who believes mentally ill people can help themselves without any strings attached. The idea is to provide those who need treatment with unconditional housing and the support services they need, even if they are substance abusers who are likely to violate traditional program requirements for curfew and sobriety.

Authored by: Sherman Smith for The Topeka Capital-Journal
Topics: Criminal justice, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Preventative care, Supportive housing
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 10, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 6, 2019
According to a new study, the Las Vegas metropolitan area’s share of voucher recipients with children living in low-poverty neighborhoods, one-third, is greater than the share of voucher-affordable rentals located in those same neighborhoods, one-fourth. That’s possible because affordable rentals far outnumber voucher recipients.

Authored by: Michael Scott Davidson for Las Vegas Review-Journal
Topics: Asset building, Education, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, West Coast
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 10, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 9, 2019
A new government report highlights just how pervasive the problem is.

Authored by: Adam Harris for The Atlantic
Topics: Food insecurity, Low-income, Nutrition, Post-secondary, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 9, 2019
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Report
Community:
Dec 1, 2018
This 2018 report updates the annual Early Childhood Homelessness State Profiles and provides a snapshot of early childhood data available for children who are experiencing homelessness in each state, plus the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. It includes publicly available data for 2015—2016 from the U.S. Census Bureau (Census), U.S. Department of Education (ED), U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Authored by: U.S. Department of Education
Topics: Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 8, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Dec 1, 2018
A guide for youths who are or were homeless, or are at risk of experiencing homelessness

Authored by: U.S. Department of Education
Topics: Education, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Post-secondary
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 8, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Dec 20, 2018
The Trump Administration proposed a Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) rule that would diminish food assistance for unemployed and underemployed people in areas with insufficient jobs; undo long-settled regulations; cynically attempt to end run Congress; and increase hunger and nutrition-related diseases.

Authored by: Emily Pickren for Food Research & Action Center
Topics: Food insecurity, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019

USDA's Proposed SNAP Rule Will Arbitrarily Limit States' Ability to Provide Benefits, Increasing Hunger and Poverty

News Article
Dec 20, 2018
Emily Pickren for Food Research & Action Center
The Trump Administration proposed a Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) rule that would diminish food assistance for unemployed and underemployed people in areas with insufficient jobs; undo long-settled regulations; cynically attempt to end run Congress; and increase hunger and nutriti
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News Article
Community:
Dec 24, 2018
When homeless people get released, their issues combined with living on the street will usually land them back in emergency rooms, costing hospitals like Harborview Medical Center — which operates on a thin margin — time and money. One solution is a type of respite program that provides short-term care to homeless patients who are too sick to be on the streets or in a shelter, but not sick enough to continue to take up a hospital bed.

Authored by: Scott Greenstone for The Seattle Times
Topics: Health, Homelessness, Housing, Pacific Northwest, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
Jan 3, 2019
The Housing Choice Voucher Program, the nation’s largest federal rental assistance program, enables families to afford decent, stable housing, avoid homelessness, and make ends meet. This map allows users to examine where voucher-assisted households live in the 50 largest metropolitan areas. Neighborhoods are color-coded according to their poverty rate, score on our opportunity index, share of residents who are people of color, and Home Owners’ Loan Corporation (HOLC) “Residential Security” maps (only available for selected cities).

Authored by: Alicia Mazzara, Brian Knudsen, and Nick Kasprak for Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Housing, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019

Interactive Map: Where Voucher Households Live in the 50 Largest Metropolitan Areas

Interactive
Jan 3, 2019
Alicia Mazzara, Brian Knudsen, and Nick Kasprak for Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The Housing Choice Voucher Program, the nation’s largest federal rental assistance program, enables families to afford decent, stable housing, avoid homelessness, and make ends meet. This map allows users to examine where voucher-assisted households live in the 50 largest metropolitan areas.
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Report
Community:
Jan 3, 2019
This analysis examines the location of families with children using vouchers in all U.S. metropolitan areas and in the 50 largest metro areas across multiple neighborhood characteristics. Using Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) administrative data and Census Bureau survey data, we compare the location of these families to the location of voucher-affordable units using three measures: neighborhood poverty, an opportunity index, and the share of residents who are people of color.

Authored by: Alicia Mazzara and Brian Knudsen for Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and PRRAC
Topics: Housing, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 3, 2019
But a new study found that in nearly all 50 of America’s biggest metropolitan areas, low-income families using federal housing vouchers remain overly concentrated in impoverished, racially segregated neighborhoods with little opportunity — even with plenty of affordable apartments available in higher income neighborhoods.

Authored by: Tracy Jan for The Washington Post
Topics: Housing, Mobility, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019

Housing vouchers mostly move families into impoverished neighborhoods, even when better apartments exist elsewhere

News Article
Jan 3, 2019
Tracy Jan for The Washington Post
But a new study found that in nearly all 50 of America’s biggest metropolitan areas, low-income families using federal housing vouchers remain overly concentrated in impoverished, racially segregated neighborhoods with little opportunity — even with plenty of affordable apartments available in highe
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News Article
Community:
Dec 27, 2018
Basic necessities like food and water have been restored since the October afternoon when the storm pummeled Panama City. But a new crisis has emerged over a need even more primal — housing.

Authored by: Kathryn Varn for Tampa Bay Times
Topics: Child welfare, Health, Housing, Low-income, Safety, South
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Dec 31, 2018
The USDA’s rental housing inventory comprises 416,000 subsidized units with an estimated 435,000 residents. Two reports this year found that, in the absence of more federal funding and better planning, the program will shed some 20,000 units by 2027. At that point, analysts predict, the loss rate will accelerate through 2050 with up to another 380,000 units expected to exit the program, gutting the overall supply by 90 percent or more.

Authored by: Martin Kuz for The Christian Science Monitor
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research, West Coast
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019

"It's like we don't exist": California's invisible rural housing crisis

News Article
Dec 31, 2018
Martin Kuz for The Christian Science Monitor
The USDA’s rental housing inventory comprises 416,000 subsidized units with an estimated 435,000 residents. Two reports this year found that, in the absence of more federal funding and better planning, the program will shed some 20,000 units by 2027.
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Publication
Community:
Jan 2, 2019
Housing quality, instability, and unaffordability threaten the well-being of millions of children across the nation. Research shows that housing is the first rung on the ladder to economic opportunity and that a person’s access to opportunity is intrinsically linked with that of the community where they live. As home prices increase, the gap between rents and incomes continues to widen, and nearly half of today’s renters are cost burdened. Child welfare professionals, educators, and pediatricians can strengthen their work by understanding the central importance of housing as a determinant of wide-ranging outcomes for the country’s youngest generation.

Authored by: Veronica Gaitan for How Housing Matters
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Health, Housing, Research, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
A collection of resources that cover public health issues such as dental care, diabetes, vaccines, and nutrition.

Authored by: Mark Barna for The Nation's Health
Topics: Child welfare, Health, Low-income, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019
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Community:
Jan 1, 2019
Environmental health services, from asthma home visiting programs to lead testing, can help protect children from the dangerous environmental exposures they encounter every day. But the problem for parents and caregivers is accessing such services, a new analysis from APHA’s Center for Public Health Policy shows.

Authored by: Julia Haskins for The Nation's Health
Topics: Asthma, Child welfare, Health, Healthy homes, Housing, Lead, Low-income, Place-based, Preventative care, Research, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 7, 2019