Welcome to Housing Is, a hub for generating effective programs and sharing innovative ideas.

Sign Up or Sign In
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
0
0
0
0
Report
Community:
May 6, 2021
As evidence grows that housing mobility programs can vastly improve residents’ life trajectories, today the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Institute for Health and Social Policy based at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and a network of experts released a report to help inform and guide supplementary research on the new Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Mobility Demonstration Program from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Including input from leaders in the housing, health, education, and economic development fields, the Report of the Housing Mobility Research Road Map Project provides research considerations for the HCV Mobility Demonstration Program, which will begin funding nine public housing agencies in Spring 2021 to provide housing vouchers and mobility services to help families move to lower-poverty neighborhoods. Housing mobility programs have the potential to disrupt historic patterns of segregation and increase families’ economic mobility. As these programs are implemented, there will be opportunities for research to inform a broad range of public policies including health, education, and housing policy.

Authored by: Oktawia Wójcik for ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION & Craig Pollack for JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
Topics: Advocacy, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Mobility, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on May 25, 2021

Report of the Housing Mobility Research Road Map Project

Report
May 6, 2021
Oktawia Wójcik for ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON FOUNDATION & Craig Pollack for JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
As evidence grows that housing mobility programs can vastly improve residents’ life trajectories, today the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Institute for Health and Social Policy based at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and a network of experts released a report to help inform and g
0
0
0
0
Policy Brief
Community:
May 5, 2021
In March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic forced many public housing authorities (PHAs) to quickly adjust their operational procedures to protect their staff while providing emergency assistance to residents. Many PHAs had to close their offices and convert to remote operations almost overnight, while staff focused on supporting their tenants by delivering them food, doing wellness checks for vulnerable residents, and ensuring they had access to and in some cases providing the technology needed for children to attend school remotely and isolated residents to remain connected to friends, family, and service providers. Moreover, as the economic crisis caused by the pandemic worsened, PHAs were under pressure to rapidly adjust rents for tenants who had lost income and process housing choice voucher (HCV) applications so people could use their vouchers to find housing. This brief provides insights into how public housing authorities used additional flexibilities that became available through a series of HUD-issued regulatory and statutory waivers, and makes the case for the potential benefits for added flexibilities for the HCV and public housing programs going forward.

Authored by: Monique King-Viehl, Elizabeth Champion, & Susan J. Popkin for URBAN INSTITUTE
Topics: Advocacy, COVID-19, Data sharing, Health, Housing, Safety, Supportive housing
Shared by Housing Is on May 25, 2021
0
0
0
0
Report
Community:
May 13, 2021
Tim Higashi and Stuart M. Butler look at several examples of innovative ways in which communities responded to COVID-19 by using a variety of special techniques to “braid and blend” funds from different programs and sources to address pressing health, education and other service need. They argue that such special flexible budgeting techniques should not end with the pandemic, but should become an integral feature of budget procedures to enable communities to reach social goals

Authored by: Stuart M. Butler and Timothy Higashi for THE BROOKINGS INSTITUTION
Topics: Advocacy, Community development, COVID-19, Data sharing, Funding, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on May 25, 2021

The COVID-19 experience shows government budgeting can become more nimble

Report
May 13, 2021
Stuart M. Butler and Timothy Higashi for THE BROOKINGS INSTITUTION
Tim Higashi and Stuart M. Butler look at several examples of innovative ways in which communities responded to COVID-19 by using a variety of special techniques to “braid and blend” funds from different programs and sources to address pressing health, education and other service need.
0
0
0
0
Video
Community:
May 20, 2021
Based off of data that Ohio has high rates of infant mortality, housing authorities there are working to address this concern, which disproportionately affects people of color. Under different initiatives, the Akron and Columbus Metropolitan Housing Authorities collaborate with cross-sector partners like mayor’s offices and public health officials to improve outcomes. Panelists will describe their efforts, tactics to reach at-risk families, and ways to fund the work.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Advocacy, Child welfare, Community development, Health, Healthy homes, Legislation & Policy, Pre-natal, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on May 20, 2021
0
0
0
0
Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
As public housing authorities have worked to keep residents and staff safe from COVID-19, they have turned from focusing on emergency response to longer-term solutions. Sub-grantees from CLPHA’s partnership with the Center for Disaster Philanthropy share how they have been implementing initiatives to counter the digital divide that has only been exacerbated by the pandemic.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Advocacy, Broadband, Community development, Education, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021
0
0
0
0
Video
Community:
May 18, 2021
Long before the pandemic forced virtual learning and digital connections, public housing authorities have been working to address unequal access to the internet and devices. Recent provisions in COVID-19 relief packages have begun to provide for temporary assistance for low-income individuals and families, and PHAs and legislators are pushing for more permanent supports. Panelists will discuss recently enacted funds, as well as introduced legislation.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Advocacy, Attendance, Broadband, CLPHA, Community development, Education, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on May 18, 2021
0
0
0
0
Podcast
Community:
Jan 13, 2021
On a day-to-day basis, vulnerable populations suffer from inequities in health, wealth, and education. These same people are then disproportionately impacted by catastrophes ranging from hurricanes to COVID-19, which only serve to underline the great and urgent need for equity across race, gender, and income. In the latest episode of The Intersect, Madeline Colety and Lorine Giangola discuss how Abt’s housing and resilience work is helping clients promote equity.

Authored by: Madeline Colety & Lorine Giangola for ABT ASSOCIATES
Topics: Advocacy, Community development, Education, Food insecurity, Health, Healthy homes, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 14, 2021
0
0
0
0
Podcast
Community:
Nov 23, 2020
“Bending the Arc” explores the everyday work of creating inclusive, equitable and racially just communities. This podcast spotlights bold thinking and action by creative, passionate, experienced thinkers and actors from cities and communities around the US and Canada. In this new episode we talk with Dr. Clinton Boyd, Jr., a Postdoctoral Associate at the Samuel Dubois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University. In our conversation we touch on a wide range of topics including our personal journeys as Black fathers, the undervaluing of Black men in general versus the idolizing of Black male athletes and entertainers, and what Clinton has learned from his research, including the Dads2Kids home visiting project. Clinton and Dr. Deirdre Oakley of Georgia State University co-authored an essay for the What Works volume on the role of Black fathers in mixed-income communities.

Authored by: National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities for CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY
Topics: Advocacy, Community development, Racial inequalities, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 12, 2021

Bending the Arc Podcast: The Connection Between Black Fatherhood and Mixed-Income Communities

Podcast
Nov 23, 2020
National Initiative on Mixed-Income Communities for CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY
“Bending the Arc” explores the everyday work of creating inclusive, equitable and racially just communities. This podcast spotlights bold thinking and action by creative, passionate, experienced thinkers and actors from cities and communities around the US and Canada.
0
0
0
0
Communications
Community: CLPHA COVID-19 Coordination
Mar 23, 2020
Special edition of CLPHA newsletter detailing the organization's efforts in response to COVID-19.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Advocacy, CLPHA, Communications, Health, Seniors
Shared by Steve Lucas on Mar 23, 2020
0
0
0
0
Webinar
Community:
Feb 12, 2020
A discussion with attorney Alex Elson from the National Student Legal Defense Network and director of FAIL STATE, Alex Shebanow, to talk about predatory for-profit institutions and how that affects low income residents. About the film: Over five years in the making, FAIL STATE investigates the for-profit college industry and the decades-long reports of student loan abuse within the sector. The film’s central thesis: aided by a cabal of politicians, nationwide disinvestment in public colleges and universities, and an unscrupulous desire to maximize profits at all costs, for-profit colleges have exploited millions of low-income and minority students, leaving them with worthless degrees and drowning in student loan debt. With echoes of the subprime mortgage crisis, director Alexander Shebanow traces the rise of the for-profit college industry in American higher education and uncovers a story that the Los Angeles Times calls “truly eye-opening and crucial.” The film premiered to sold-out shows at DOC NYC, SXSW EDU, Cleveland International, and debuted on STARZ in December 2018. Director Alexander Shebanow and Executive Producer Dan Rather were awarded the 2019 William Randolph Hearst Award for Outstanding Professional Media Service for their work on FAIL STATE.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: Advocacy, CLPHA, Education, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Post-secondary
Shared by Abra Lyons-Warren on Feb 12, 2020

CLPHA Education Working Group: Predatory PostSecondary Institutions Webinar

Webinar
Feb 12, 2020
CLPHA
A discussion with attorney Alex Elson from the National Student Legal Defense Network and director of FAIL STATE, Alex Shebanow, to talk about predatory for-profit institutions and how that affects low income residents. About the film: Over five years in the making, FAIL STATE investigates the fo
0
0
0
0
Policy Brief
Community:
Dec 4, 2019
In California, more than 3.7 million students were eligible for free or reduced priced school meals in the 2017-2018 school year. For many of those students, school meals are the primary source of regular access to healthy food. When the bell rings at 3:00 or lets out for summer break, many of those students go home to nutritional uncertainty or high-calorie, low-nutrient foods. For many low-income families, the out-of-school-time food access gap increases family stress: limited budgets are stretched further to cover food, rent, utilities, transportation, medications, and chidcare costs. For very young children, food insecurity can negatively impact brain and physical development. For children of all ages, disrupted access to healthy food can impact behavior, increase risk of obesity, make it harder to concentrate, or exacerbate existing healthy conditions like type 2 diabetes. The impact is not limited to summer, and can lead to a rocky start to the school year, negatively impacting school attendance and students’ ability to effectively participate in school. Read the full brief to learn how public and affordable housing communities can address food insecurity for children and youth with the help of out-of-school-time USDA child nutrition programs.

Authored by:
Topics: Advocacy, Early childhood, Food insecurity, Health, Healthy homes, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition, Out-of-school time, West Coast, Youth
Shared by Linda Lu on Dec 4, 2019

Keeping Kids Healthy and Engaged When School is Out Through Public and Affordable Housing Communities

Policy Brief
Dec 4, 2019
In California, more than 3.7 million students were eligible for free or reduced priced school meals in the 2017-2018 school year. For many of those students, school meals are the primary source of regular access to healthy food.