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5th Annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17

Join us for our 5th annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17, 2019, in Washington, D.C. This unique two-day conference brings together diverse housing, health, and education stakeholders to explore innovative system alignment efforts and develop cross-sector solutions to complex challenges all three sectors face.

Learn More & Register
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Register Now: 2019 Housing Is Summit

CLPHA is pleased to announce that renowned physician, epidemiologist, researcher, and activist Dr. Camara Jones will be a keynote speaker at our fifth annual Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., May 16-17. Dr. Jones will present on the need to address social determinants of health to reduce health disparities as well as the interdisciplinary nature of a strong safety net.

Register Today
 
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Research
Community:
Apr 29, 2019
When following the mother–child pair from pregnancy through five years postpartum, the estimated cost is $14.2 billion for births in 2017, or an average of $32,000 for every mother–child pair affected but not treated.

Authored by: Mathematica
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Mental health, Pre-natal, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 30, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
Self-paced courses for home visitors and supervisors and webinars that cover: the basics of home visiting, foundations of infant mental health in home visiting, domestic violence in home visiting, substance abuse in home visiting, the impact of trauma on home visiting, building engaging and collaborative relationships with families, and home visiting with families during pregnancy.

Authored by: The Ounce
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Health, Home visiting
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 29, 2019
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Research
Community:
Apr 23, 2019
Sweeping changes designed to make the food more nutritious in a federal assistance program for low-income families reduced the risk for obesity for 4-year-olds who had been on the program since birth, according to new research.

Authored by: UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
Topics: Early childhood, Food insecurity, Low-income, Nutrition, Obesity, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 29, 2019

UCLA-Tulane study finds improved WIC food packages reduced children's risk for obesity

Research
Apr 23, 2019
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
Sweeping changes designed to make the food more nutritious in a federal assistance program for low-income families reduced the risk for obesity for 4-year-olds who had been on the program since birth, according to new research.
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Report
Community:
As the United States rapidly becomes both a more diverse and unequal nation, policymakers face the urgent challenge of confronting growing wealth gaps by race and ethnicity. To create a more equitable and secure future, we must shift away from public policies that fuel and exacerbate racial disparities in wealth. But which policies can truly begin to reduce our country’s expanding racial divergences?

Authored by: Demos and The Institute on Assets and Social Policy (IASP)
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 26, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 26, 2019
In the District of Columbia, low-income residents are being pushed out of neighborhoods at some of the highest rates in the country, according to the Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity, which sought to track demographic and economic changes in neighborhoods in the 50 largest U.S. cities from 2000 to 2016.

Authored by: Marissa J. Lang for The Washington Post
Topics: Community development, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 26, 2019

Gentrification in D.C. means widespread displacement, bucking national trends, report says

News Article
Apr 26, 2019
Marissa J. Lang for The Washington Post
In the District of Columbia, low-income residents are being pushed out of neighborhoods at some of the highest rates in the country, according to the Institute on Metropolitan Opportunity, which sought to track demographic and economic changes in neighborhoods in the 50 largest U.S.
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Publication
Community:
Apr 24, 2019
Are you a Pennsylvanian without a high school diploma? Then sign up with AmeriHealth Caritas for Medicaid and the plan will help you get your GED. Having trouble getting a job in Ohio? If you are enrolled in CareSource, the Life Services JobConnect in CareSource’s managed care organization (MCO) will arrange job coaching and other employment services at no cost. These are not examples of corporate philanthropy. Rather, they reflect a growing recognition in the health care sector, especially among managed care organizations, that good health—and achieving lower medical costs—requires a focus on the nonmedical factors known as social determinants that affect health and well-being.

Authored by: Stuart Butler for news@Jama
Topics: Education, Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Low-income, Nutrition, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 24, 2019
A new report from DePaul University’s Institute for Housing Studies shows that a loss of affordable rental units is a growing challenge across the city. The loss is especially acute in Logan Square and other neighborhoods on the city’s North and Northwest sides, the report says.

Authored by: Blair Kamin for The Chicago Tribune
Topics: Housing, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019

Rents rise, supply drops - Chicago's affordable housing woes mount

News Article
Apr 24, 2019
Blair Kamin for The Chicago Tribune
A new report from DePaul University’s Institute for Housing Studies shows that a loss of affordable rental units is a growing challenge across the city. The loss is especially acute in Logan Square and other neighborhoods on the city’s North and Northwest sides, the report says.
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News Article
Community:
Apr 21, 2019
The county’s preliminary results look promising: more than 78% of Vital clients were booked into jail less often once enrolled in the program for at least six months. On average, Vital participants went to jail about a third less often per year compared to the three years before their enrollment. A typical client had at least two fewer bookings into a King County Jail compared to the three years before entering the program.

Authored by: Vianna Davila for The Seattle Times
Topics: Criminal justice, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Mental health, Partnerships, Substance abuse
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019

From homelessness to jail and back: King County Tries to halt cycle

News Article
Apr 21, 2019
Vianna Davila for The Seattle Times
The county’s preliminary results look promising: more than 78% of Vital clients were booked into jail less often once enrolled in the program for at least six months. On average, Vital participants went to jail about a third less often per year compared to the three years before their enrollment.
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News Article
Community:
Apr 21, 2019
An EdSource analysis of teacher salaries and rents reveals just how crushing California’s housing crisis has become for many teachers.Teachers at the bottom of the salary scale working in coastal or metro areas of the state are being shut out of affordable housing. Many are spending more than 30% of their salary on rent, the federal cutoff for affordable housing.

Authored by: Diana Lambert and Daniel Willis for The San Francisco Chronicle
Topics: Education, Housing, Low-income, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019

California's teacher housing crunch: Rising rents in coastal areas outpace pay

News Article
Apr 21, 2019
Diana Lambert and Daniel Willis for The San Francisco Chronicle
An EdSource analysis of teacher salaries and rents reveals just how crushing California’s housing crisis has become for many teachers.Teachers at the bottom of the salary scale working in coastal or metro areas of the state are being shut out of affordable housing.
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Research
Community:
May 18, 2018
Parent involvement is associated with child academic outcomes, positive behaviors, and social skills. This qualitative study explored school-based parent involvement barriers experienced by nine low-income mothers. In-depth interviews were used to collect data from mothers participating in a community-based program offered in a large public housing neighborhood. Findings included three main barriers: (a) cultural and language differences in their children’s school, (b) undertones of racism from teachers and parents, and (c) being the primary caregiver or sole provider for their children. Although all parents experience challenges to school involvement, low-income mothers face additional obstacles preventing them from engaging in their children’s schools. This perceived lack of school involvement can lead to feelings of helplessness, shame, and stigma.

Authored by: Stephanie Lechuga-Pena and Daniel Brisson for TQR
Topics: Education, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019

Barriers to School-Based Parent Involvement While Living in Public Housing: A Mother's Perspective

Research
May 18, 2018
Stephanie Lechuga-Pena and Daniel Brisson for TQR
Parent involvement is associated with child academic outcomes, positive behaviors, and social skills. This qualitative study explored school-based parent involvement barriers experienced by nine low-income mothers.
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Publication
Community:
Apr 25, 2019
Adequate, safe, and affordable housing is one of our most basic needs. But in the US, access to housing is not guaranteed. Demand for affordable housing is growing, especially as housing costs increase beyond wage growth in many communities. Hospitals and health systems are stepping in to help fill this gap. Because of their mission orientation, the importance of stable housing on health outcomes, and policy changes initiated by the Affordable Care Act, hospitals and health systems are increasingly investing in and supporting the creation of affordable housing in their communities.

Authored by: Martha Fedorowicz and Kathryn Reynolds for How Housing Matters, The Urban Institute
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Community development, Health, Housing, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 25, 2019

Three Ways Hospitals and Health Systems Can Improve How They Invest in Affordable Housing

Publication
Apr 25, 2019
Martha Fedorowicz and Kathryn Reynolds for How Housing Matters, The Urban Institute
Adequate, safe, and affordable housing is one of our most basic needs. But in the US, access to housing is not guaranteed. Demand for affordable housing is growing, especially as housing costs increase beyond wage growth in many communities.
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Publication
Community:
Apr 24, 2019
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and states spend over $300 billion per year on the care of dually eligible individuals, yet still do not achieve acceptable health outcomes. In a 2016 study of social risk factors in the Medicare value-based purchasing programs, dual enrollment status was the most powerful predictor of poor outcomes. For example, relative to Medicare-only beneficiaries, dually eligible individuals had 10-31 percent higher risk-adjusted odds of hospital readmission across conditions measured in the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and scores were lower for dually eligible individuals on nearly all (17 of 19) beneficiary-level quality measures in Medicare Advantage.

Authored by: Seema Verma for Health Affairs
Topics: Dual-eligibles, Funding, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 24, 2019
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Report
Community:
Apr 1, 2019
College Promise programs aim to make students believe they can afford college, and to give them the opportunity to go to college and earn degrees without taking on significant debt. At the core of all College Promise programs is a scholarship: All eligible College Promise students receive scholarships that may cover up to 100 percent of tuition and fees at postsecondary institutions. Additionally, many Promise programs are designing, implementing, and refining additions to their models by providing students with support services once they enroll in college. MDRC’s College Promise Success Initiative (CPSI) provides important lessons for Promise programs interested in including such services.This brief shares early lessons from CPSI about how different Promise programs are designing, implementing, and refining their models with embedded student services in mind.

Authored by: Jacklyn Willard, Andrea Vasquez, and Marco Lepe for MDRC
Topics: Education, Low-income, Post-secondary, Research, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 24, 2019
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Report
Community:
Apr 20, 2019
Detroit’s Promise program was designed to encourage college attendance among some of the nation’s most underserved students, those in Detroit, Michigan. The next step was to help students succeed once they enrolled in college. To do so, MDRC and the Detroit Promise partnered to create the Detroit Promise Path, an evidence-based student services program. Detroit Promise Path students begin meeting with college coaches in the late summer before their first semester of college. They are given an incentive to attend coaching meetings in the form of a monthly gift card refilled with $50 each month that they meet with coaches as directed. The program lasts all year, including summer semesters, when students are encouraged to enroll in summer classes or engage in a local summer jobs program. The entire operation is supported by a management information system.

Authored by: MDRC
Topics: Education, Low-income, Midwest, Post-secondary, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 24, 2019
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Research
Community:
Apr 1, 2019
Serious mental illness (SMI) is a disabling condition that develops early in life and imposes substantial economic burden. There is a growing belief that early intervention for SMI has lifelong benefits for patients. However, assessing the cost-effectiveness of early intervention efforts is hampered by a lack of evidence on the long-term benefits. We addressed this by using a dynamic microsimulation model to estimate the lifetime burden of SMI for those diagnosed by age twenty-five.

Authored by: Health Affairs
Topics: Disabilities, Education, Low-income, Mental health, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 23, 2019

Measuring The Lifetime Costs of Serious Mental Illness And The Mitigating Effects of Educational Attainment

Research
Apr 1, 2019
Health Affairs
Serious mental illness (SMI) is a disabling condition that develops early in life and imposes substantial economic burden. There is a growing belief that early intervention for SMI has lifelong benefits for patients.
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Publication
Community:
Apr 11, 2019
Consistent with Executive Order 13853, “Establishing the White House Opportunity and Revitalization Council,” this document informs the public that HUD intends to maximize the beneficial impact of investment in Opportunity Zones. HUD is reviewing its existing policies, practices, planned actions, regulations, and guidance regarding HUD-administered programs and laws to identify actions HUD can take to encourage beneficial investment, both public and private, in urban and economically distressed communities, including qualified Opportunity Zones. HUD seeks input and recommendations from the public regarding potential agency actions.

Authored by: Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
Topics: Community development, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 23, 2019
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Research
Community:
Apr 16, 2019
This report presents a case study of the Chicago Housing Authority’s (CHA’s) work requirement policy, one of a small number of work requirements implemented by housing authorities. The report describes the CHA work requirement, the policy’s implementation and how it has changed, and perceptions of implementation and outcomes from key CHA and service provider staff and residents. The CHA work requirement has been in place for nearly 10 years, allowing us to analyze implementation over time and outcomes.

Authored by: Diane K. Levy, Leiha Edmonds, Samantha Batko, and Marcus Gaddy for The Urban Institute
Topics: Asset building, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Midwest, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 23, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 16, 2019
ProMedica and LISC team up to fund place-based investments in the hope of improving residents’ health. How do they do it?

Authored by: Amanda Abrams for Shelter Force
Topics: Community development, Health, Housing, Place-based
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 23, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 9, 2019
Until recently, efforts to improve the health of Americans have focused on expanding access to quality medical care. Yet there is a growing recognition that medical care alone cannot address what actually makes us sick. Increasing health care costs and worsening life expectancy are the results of a frayed social safety net, economic and housing instability, racism and other forms of discrimination, educational disparities, inadequate nutrition, and risks within the physical environment. These factors affect our health long before the health care system ever gets involved.

Authored by: Brian Castrucci and John Auerbach for Shelter Force
Topics: Food insecurity, Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Transportation
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 23, 2019

Meeting Individual Social Needs Falls Short of Addressing Social Determinants of Health

News Article
Apr 9, 2019
Brian Castrucci and John Auerbach for Shelter Force
Until recently, efforts to improve the health of Americans have focused on expanding access to quality medical care. Yet there is a growing recognition that medical care alone cannot address what actually makes us sick.
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News Article
Community:
Apr 17, 2019
A survey of LGBTQ Midwesterners and their families finds they are more likely to receive public assistance than non-LGBTQ people.

Authored by: Cincinnati Public Radio
Topics: Low-income, Midwest, Stability
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 22, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 17, 2019
In the United States, nearly 13 percent of people are food insecure, living without reliable access to basic nutrition. But the problem is even more dramatic on college campuses, where a recent study found that 48% of students report food insecurity and live without regular access to food.

Authored by: Jessica Allred for Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity
Topics: Food insecurity, Nutrition, Post-secondary, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 22, 2019

Colleges Grapple with Student Food Insecurity

News Article
Apr 17, 2019
Jessica Allred for Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity
In the United States, nearly 13 percent of people are food insecure, living without reliable access to basic nutrition. But the problem is even more dramatic on college campuses, where a recent study found that 48% of students report food insecurity and live without regular access to food.
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News Article
Community:
Apr 10, 2019
Housing has been famously unaffordable in expensive cities such as San Francisco for a while. But now in tiny towns and counties across the country, an increasing share of rural residents are struggling to pay their rents and mortgages.

Authored by: Aimee Picchi for CBS News
Topics: Homelessness, Housing
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 22, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 22, 2019
Ballooning lunch debt is a problem for families and schools across the country. And it's evidence of a broken school lunch system that uses students’ needs as collateral to leverage money from parents.

Authored by: Jessica Fu for The New Food Economy
Topics: Food insecurity, Health, Nutrition
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 22, 2019

Countless American families are saddled with student lunch debt. Many won't be able to pay it off.

News Article
Apr 22, 2019
Jessica Fu for The New Food Economy
Ballooning lunch debt is a problem for families and schools across the country. And it's evidence of a broken school lunch system that uses students’ needs as collateral to leverage money from parents.
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Publication
Community:
Apr 16, 2019
When it comes to the federally funded Afterschool and Summer Meal Programs, what is the trick to engaging teens better? Across the country, both anti-hunger advocates and out-of-school time program providers are asking themselves this very question.

Authored by: Clarissa Hayes for Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
Topics: Food insecurity, Nutrition, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 22, 2019

3 Tips for Engaging Teens in The Summer And In Afterschool Meal Programs

Publication
Apr 16, 2019
Clarissa Hayes for Food Research & Action Center (FRAC)
When it comes to the federally funded Afterschool and Summer Meal Programs, what is the trick to engaging teens better? Across the country, both anti-hunger advocates and out-of-school time program providers are asking themselves this very question.
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News Article
Community:
Apr 17, 2019
While Congress has both the power and the duty to forestall the loss of this important resource, its actions to date only hasten the deterioration and demolition of public housing.

Authored by: Timothy Kaiser for the Orlando Sentinel
Topics: Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 19, 2019