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5th Annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17

Join us for our 5th annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17, 2019, in Washington, D.C. This unique two-day conference brings together diverse housing, health, and education stakeholders to explore innovative system alignment efforts and develop cross-sector solutions to complex challenges all three sectors face.

Learn More & Register
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Register Now: 2019 Housing Is Summit

CLPHA is pleased to announce that renowned physician, epidemiologist, researcher, and activist Dr. Camara Jones will be a keynote speaker at our fifth annual Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., May 16-17. Dr. Jones will present on the need to address social determinants of health to reduce health disparities as well as the interdisciplinary nature of a strong safety net.

Register Today
 
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Research
Community:
Feb 6, 2019
Research suggests that living in concentrated poverty is harmful to health, well-being, and economic mobility. Inclusionary zoning can break up poverty density by imposing legal requirements to create affordable housing across neighborhoods. In Montgomery County, Maryland, inclusionary zoning laws require developers to set aside 12 to 15 percent of new homes at below-market rates and allow the public housing authority to purchase a portion of these units. As a result, two-thirds of public housing residents in Montgomery County live in economically diverse, low-poverty neighborhoods. To assess the effects of these unique conditions, researchers explored how public housing residents’ social networks, neighborhood perceptions, and health outcomes differ based on their placement in mixed-income communities or traditionally clustered public housing.

Authored by: Heather Schwartz, Susan Burkhauser, Beth Ann Griffin, David Kennedy, Harold Green Jr., Alene Kennedy-Hendricks, and Craig Pollack for Housing Policy Debate, How Housing Matters
Topics: Community development, Housing, Mental health, Place-based, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 7, 2019

Inclusionary Zoning Can Improve Outcomes for Public Housing Residents

Research
Feb 6, 2019
Heather Schwartz, Susan Burkhauser, Beth Ann Griffin, David Kennedy, Harold Green Jr., Alene Kennedy-Hendricks, and Craig Pollack for Housing Policy Debate, How Housing Matters
Research suggests that living in concentrated poverty is harmful to health, well-being, and economic mobility. Inclusionary zoning can break up poverty density by imposing legal requirements to create affordable housing across neighborhoods.
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Publication
Community:
Feb 6, 2019
Decent, stable, and affordable rental housing has the power to improve lives, yet background checks and other systemic barriers reduce housing access and stability for a large part of the population—people who have been arrested or who are reentering communities after incarceration. The number of people who can be shut out of rental housing by criminal background checks and related policies calls for a national and local conversation about evidence-based ways to balance public safety and cohesion goals while supporting people with justice system histories in finding stable housing. Achieving this balance could interrupt cycles of inequity.

Authored by: Veronica Gaitan and Maya Brennan for How Housing Matters, Urban Institute
Topics: Criminal justice, Homelessness, Housing
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 7, 2019

For Reentry Success and Beyond, Rental Housing Access Matters

Publication
Feb 6, 2019
Veronica Gaitan and Maya Brennan for How Housing Matters, Urban Institute
Decent, stable, and affordable rental housing has the power to improve lives, yet background checks and other systemic barriers reduce housing access and stability for a large part of the population—people who have been arrested or who are reentering communities after incarceration.
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Report
Community:
Jan 31, 2019
For a very young child, the relationship with a primary caregiver, most often though not exclusively a mother, lays an important psychological foundation for later flourishing. Successful attachment and bonding in the first two years of life predicts healthy later development on a range of fronts, from mental health to educational skills. When bonding and attachment prove difficult, child development is affected. Recent advances in brain science allow this impact to be shown more clearly and more definitively.

Authored by: Richard V. Reeves for Brookings Institution
Topics: Child welfare, Depression, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Health, Low-income, Mental health, Mobility
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Feb 5, 2019
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Webinar
Community:
Jul 17, 2018
Featuring Ellen Childs, PhD, from Boston University School of Public Health and Vaughan Rees, PhD, from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Authored by: Building Success
Topics: Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Smoke-free
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 4, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Build success with effective enforcement. Someone who smokes where smoking is prohibited is violating the policy. Enforcement of the smoke-free policy is similar to enforcement of other building policies, like noise or pet restrictions. Be consistent, fair, positive, and pragmatic.

Authored by: Building Success
Topics: Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Smoke-free
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 4, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Build success by helping smokers comply with the policy. Some residents who smoke may not be ready or able to stop smoking, but you can work with them to help them comply with the policy. Showing compassion to residents facing barriers to compliance may increase acceptance of the policy and willingness to comply.

Authored by: Building Success
Topics: Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Smoke-free
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 4, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Build success by supporting cessation among smokers for whom a smoke-free housing policy may provide motivation to quit.

Authored by: Building Success
Topics: Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Smoke-free
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 4, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Build success by partnering with local agencies and organizations. Community partners can advise during planning, education residents during implementation, and help support cessation.

Authored by: Building Success
Topics: Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Partnerships, Smoke-free
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 4, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Build success by training staff on how to effectively share information about the policy and the importance of consistent enforcement.

Authored by: Building Success
Topics: Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Smoke-free
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 4, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Build Success by engaging residents. Residents can be a strong asset in planning, communication, implementation, and compliance efforts.

Authored by: Building Success
Topics: Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Place-based, Smoke-free
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 4, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Developing effective smoke-free policies requires clear language about why the policy is being adopted, where smoking is and isn't allowed, who is responsible for reporting and investigating violations, and how the policy will be enforced.

Authored by: Building Success
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Place-based, Smoke-free
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 4, 2019
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Policy Brief
Community:
More than one-third of adult public housing residents in the US smoke—totaling approximately 400,000 smokers, putting other residents and staff at risk of negative health effects.

Authored by: Building Success
Topics: Asthma, Health, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Place-based, Smoke-free
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 4, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 4, 2019
The U.S. territory needs to urgently tackle issues such as "widespread informal housing" and "the exorbitant amount of abandoned spaces" as it rebuilds after Hurricane Maria.

Authored by: Nicole Acevedo for NBC News
Topics: Community development, Food insecurity, Funding, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Nutrition, Safety, Stability, U.S. Territories
Shared by Housing Is on Feb 4, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Jan 7, 2019
Times are changing rapidly for families—our households, work and the workforce do not look like they did just a decade ago. Challenges and barriers for parents continue to grow – skyrocketing costs of health care and child care, lack of flexibility at the workplace, and less time at home. Working parents have to balance their budget and time across an ever-changing landscape of needs: from caring for themselves, their children, and older family members, to affording quality child care and paying household bills. Removing barriers so families can care for their loved ones requires us to rethink and update the supports in place for working parents to keep up with the realities of a changing workforce.

Authored by: Lindsay Broyhill for Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Family engagement, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Preventative care
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 31, 2019

Family Prosperity: Value All Care, Value Every Family

Publication
Jan 7, 2019
Lindsay Broyhill for Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Times are changing rapidly for families—our households, work and the workforce do not look like they did just a decade ago. Challenges and barriers for parents continue to grow – skyrocketing costs of health care and child care, lack of flexibility at the workplace, and less time at home.
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Research
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
Our aim with this environmental scan was to explore the capacity of public health to advance racial and health equity with community engagement as a central strategy. The partners had to make decisions about whether to be prescriptive in defining core constructs such as health equity and racial equity and whether to explore the public health system broadly or narrow our focus to governmental public health agencies specifically.

Authored by: National Collaborative for Health Equity
Topics: Health, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 31, 2019

Building Public Health Capacity to Advance Equity: A National Environmental Scan of Tribal, State, and Local Governmental Public Health

Research
Jan 1, 2019
National Collaborative for Health Equity
Our aim with this environmental scan was to explore the capacity of public health to advance racial and health equity with community engagement as a central strategy.
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Interactive
Community:
The map focuses on four critical areas of policy: protections against source-of-income discrimination, the regulation of short-term rentals, inclusionary housing programs, and rent control. The rising tide of state preemption detailed in this tool makes it clear that local initiatives and innovation are being blocked when the need for affordable housing and creativity in advancing inclusion is most needed.

Authored by: Poverty and Race Research Action Council
Topics: Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 31, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
A healthy birth and positive experiences in early childhood can promote health and development. One approach that has improved outcomes for children and their parents is home visiting, which provides individually tailored support, resources, and information to expectant parents and families with young children. This brief summarizes recently published reports from two national studies of evidence-based early childhood home visiting: the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE) and MIHOPE-Strong Start.

Authored by: MDRC
Topics: Child welfare, Dual-generation, Early childhood, Home visiting, Metrics, Partnerships, Place-based, Preventative care, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 31, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Jan 25, 2019
A long understudied facet of the American housing market, evictions have hit no area of the country harder than the South, a region home to most of the top-evicting large and mid-sized U.S. cities, according to a list released by Princeton’s Eviction Lab.

Authored by: Max Blau for The Telegraph
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Research, South, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 31, 2019

Black southerners are bearing the brunt of America's eviction epidemic

News Article
Jan 25, 2019
Max Blau for The Telegraph
A long understudied facet of the American housing market, evictions have hit no area of the country harder than the South, a region home to most of the top-evicting large and mid-sized U.S. cities, according to a list released by Princeton’s Eviction Lab.
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News Article
Community:
Jan 29, 2019
Housing complex would integrate residents with special needs into the larger community

Authored by: Tara Bahrampour for The Washington Post
Topics: Disabilities, Dual-generation, Housing, Mental health, Place-based, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 31, 2019
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Publication
Community:
Evidence shows that retrofitting the entire stock of multifamily apartment buildings in the United States could save tenants and property owners $8 billion a year in energy costs and reduce electricity consumption by almost 15 percent. Amid the rising cost of housing, energy efficiency upgrades can provide much-needed relief to low-income families and help keep rental stock affordable, but few documented examples showcase the benefits of energy retrofits in multifamily housing. Addressing this gap, this study measures the impact of a collaborative energy efficiency program in Orlando, Florida, analyzing energy costs before and after retrofits in four multifamily apartment complexes.

Authored by: Nicholas Taylor, Jennison Searcy, and Pierce Jones for Energy Efficiency
Topics: Energy, Housing, Low-income, Research, Sustainability
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 31, 2019

Energy Efficiency Upgrades Can Help Multifamily Housing Remain Affordable

Publication
Nicholas Taylor, Jennison Searcy, and Pierce Jones for Energy Efficiency
Evidence shows that retrofitting the entire stock of multifamily apartment buildings in the United States could save tenants and property owners $8 billion a year in energy costs and reduce electricity consumption by almost 15 percent.
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Publication
Community:
Jan 30, 2019
To understand more about housing from an epidemiologist’s perspective, we spoke with Earle Chambers, an associate professor in the Department of Family and Social Medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Chambers has documented the connections between housing and neighborhood conditions and health disparities among low-income Latinos in the Bronx.

Authored by: Lisette Vegas and Maya Brennan for How Housing Matters
Topics: Asthma, Community development, Depression, East Coast, Health, Obesity, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 31, 2019

Housing as a Social Determinant of Health: A Q&A with Epidemiologist Earl Chambers

Publication
Jan 30, 2019
Lisette Vegas and Maya Brennan for How Housing Matters
To understand more about housing from an epidemiologist’s perspective, we spoke with Earle Chambers, an associate professor in the Department of Family and Social Medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.
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Policy Brief
Community:
Jan 30, 2019
Under the continuing resolution (CR) that provided the funding to reopen the government for three weeks, SNAP (food stamps) now is fully funded at least through March, even if the government shuts down again on February 15. Millions of families, however, face a longer-than-usual gap between their February and March benefits because the Agriculture Department worked with states to issue February benefits early during the shutdown, and that could further strain household budgets, the emergency food network, and other community resources.

Authored by: Dottie Rensbaum for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Food insecurity, Funding, Health, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Nutrition
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Jan 30, 2019

SNAP Can Cover Full Benefits Through March, But Participants Face Big Gaps Between February and March Benefits

Policy Brief
Jan 30, 2019
Dottie Rensbaum for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Under the continuing resolution (CR) that provided the funding to reopen the government for three weeks, SNAP (food stamps) now is fully funded at least through March, even if the government shuts down again on February 15.
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Community:

Authored by:
Topics:
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 30, 2019
New Community | Jan 30, 2019

Behavioral Health

Behavioral health problems can negatively affect an individual's ability to remain stably housed. With certain supports, however, those struggling with addiction and/or mental health issues can live better lives. 

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Community:

Authored by:
Topics:
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 30, 2019
New Community | Jan 30, 2019

Veterans

After serving our country, all veterans deserve a place to call home with the supports they need to succeed.  With the VASH program and supportive housing options, we can help transition more veterans out of homelessness and poverty. 

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Community:

Authored by:
Topics:
Shared by Housing Is on Jan 30, 2019
New Community | Jan 30, 2019

Disaster Relief and Recovery

How can we support our fellow public housing autorities, schools, health clinics and medical services providers, and other partners in areas affected by natural disasters? What have we learned from past efforts and how can we better serve vulnerable populations in the future?