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Welcome to Housing Is, a hub for generating effective programs and sharing innovative ideas.

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5th Annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17

Join us for our 5th annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17, 2019, in Washington, D.C. This unique two-day conference brings together diverse housing, health, and education stakeholders to explore innovative system alignment efforts and develop cross-sector solutions to complex challenges all three sectors face.

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Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 
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National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 
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Register Now: 2019 Housing Is Summit

We are excited to announce that the annual Housing Is Summit will be held on May 16-17, 2019 in Washington, DC. The Summit will offer two days of plenary speakers, breakout sessions, and caucus discussions devoted to cross-sector thinking on housing, health, and education, as well as opportunities for action. We hope you can join us!

 
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Publication
Community:
Dec 1, 2018
With collectively more than 100 years of policy expertise and values-based leadership between us, Ascend at the Aspen Institute and the Housing Opportunity and Services Together initiative at the Urban Institute partnered to develop a set of recommendations on how to harness assisted housing and public-private housing partnerships for better outcomes for families.

Authored by: The Urban Institute and ASCEND: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Education, Family engagement, Health, Housing, Low-income, Place-based, Research, Stability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018

Place Matters: A Two-Generation Approach to Housing

Publication
Dec 1, 2018
The Urban Institute and ASCEND: The Aspen Institute
With collectively more than 100 years of policy expertise and values-based leadership between us, Ascend at the Aspen Institute and the Housing Opportunity and Services Together initiative at the Urban Institute partnered to develop a set of recommendations on how to harness assisted housing and pub
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Publication
Community:
Dec 6, 2018
The administration has proposed an expansion of the “public charge” rule that would make it more difficult for applicants whom officials deem likely to rely on public assistance to obtain lawful permanent residence (a “green card”) or a temporary visa. Among other changes, the rule would expand public charge determinations to include an applicant’s enrollment in the Medicaid program. Adding Medicaid to the list of public charge benefits that would be considered may force immigrants to choose between health insurance coverage and a future green card—with adverse consequences for parents and their children.

Authored by: Emily M. Johnston, Genevieve M. Kenney, and Jennifer M. Haley for The Urban Institute
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Health, Housing, Immigrants, Legislation & Policy, Medicaid / Medicare, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018

Penalizing immigrants for obtaining Medicaid coverage puts child and family well-being at risk

Publication
Dec 6, 2018
Emily M. Johnston, Genevieve M. Kenney, and Jennifer M. Haley for The Urban Institute
The administration has proposed an expansion of the “public charge” rule that would make it more difficult for applicants whom officials deem likely to rely on public assistance to obtain lawful permanent residence (a “green card”) or a temporary visa.
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Research
Community:
Dec 5, 2018
How does the quality of where we live affect our children’s development? The impact of housing and neighborhood quality on physical health has long been studied in the public health field, but studies that aim to assess those same impacts on mental health are less common. This study examined the relationship between the physical quality of housing and neighborhoods and their interactive effect on the mental health and motivation of children from elementary school through young adulthood.

Authored by: Journal of Environmental Psychology
Topics: Child welfare, Community development, Housing, Low-income, Mental health, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018

How Housing and Neighborhood Quality Affect Children's Mental Health

Research
Dec 5, 2018
Journal of Environmental Psychology
How does the quality of where we live affect our children’s development? The impact of housing and neighborhood quality on physical health has long been studied in the public health field, but studies that aim to assess those same impacts on mental health are less common.
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Interactive
Community:
Nov 15, 2018
In an equitable DC, every resident would have the opportunity to prosper. But decades of discriminatory policies and practices have created inequities by ward, neighborhood, and race and ethnicity. Public, private, and nonprofit interventions have narrowed these gaps, but more needs to be done to level the playing field. This tool shows what it would take to improve equity across wards and neighborhoods on 16 key indicators. Select different areas of the District to compare or set your own goals for equity.

Authored by: The Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, East Coast, Education, Mobility, Place-based, Post-secondary, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018
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Publication
Community:
Dec 6, 2018
When we refer to people who are, or have been, in contact with the criminal justice system as “felons,” “offenders,” “inmates,” or “convicts,” we define them by the worst act of their lives, creating a stigma that lingers long after they’ve paid their debt to society. If we are serious about removing barriers for people with felony convictions, we must change the words we use to describe them.

Authored by: Cameron Okeke and Nancy G. La Vigne for The Urban Institute
Topics: Criminal justice, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018

Restoring humanity: Changing the way we talk about people touched by the criminal justice system

Publication
Dec 6, 2018
Cameron Okeke and Nancy G. La Vigne for The Urban Institute
When we refer to people who are, or have been, in contact with the criminal justice system as “felons,” “offenders,” “inmates,” or “convicts,” we define them by the worst act of their lives, creating a stigma that lingers long after they’ve paid their debt to society.
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Research
Community:
Nov 28, 2018
Research shows that the racial composition of the public school student population has changed substantially over the past 25 years, but student racial sorting among schools has remained relatively stable. A growing body of research shows that school segregation matters for the educational and socioeconomic outcomes of students of color. To fix it, however, we have to understand why racial segregation has persisted.

Authored by: The Urban Institute
Topics: Community development, Education, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 6, 2018
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Podcast
Community:
Why does it seem as if poverty is segregated to certain neighborhoods? What’s the secret to addressing the root of intergenerational poverty? How can we bring in new investment while preserving the history and culture of a place? Join us to explore these questions and more.

Authored by: Purpose Built Communities
Topics: Community development, Education, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Place-based, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 5, 2018

This is Community Podcast

Podcast
Purpose Built Communities
Why does it seem as if poverty is segregated to certain neighborhoods? What’s the secret to addressing the root of intergenerational poverty? How can we bring in new investment while preserving the history and culture of a place? Join us to explore these questions and more.
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Interactive
Community:
The 2018 Purpose Built Conference in Orlando, Florida from October 24 – 26 was a tremendous opportunity for thoughtful engagement and energetic conversations with Network Members and attendees from all across the country. Our panel of guest speakers represented a wide range of industries and brought unique perspectives and insights.

Authored by: Purpose Built Communities
Topics: Community development, Education, Health, Housing, Low-income, Mobility, Partnerships, Place-based
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 5, 2018
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Interactive
Community:
People living just a few blocks apart may have vastly different opportunities to live a long life in part because of their neighborhood. Unfortunately, significant gaps in life expectancy at birth persist across many United States cities, towns, ZIP codes and neighborhoods. The latest estimates of life expectancy at birth reveals differences down to the census tract level. Explore how life expectancy in America compares with life expectancy in your area, and resources to help everyone have the opportunity to live a longer, healthier life.

Authored by: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Topics: Health, Housing, Low-income, Place-based, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 5, 2018
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Publication
Community:
Nov 14, 2018
In collaboration with Project for Public Spaces (PPS), the National Main Street Center (NMSC), and others, the Bass Center will examine the place needs of people and businesses and use that knowledge to help public, private, and civic sectors leaders develop new approaches to creating and supporting concentrations of economic activity that drive inclusive economic growth. The Center is premised on the idea that these “economic districts” represent the geographies in which leaders can have the most transformative impact—where they can build local trust and understanding, experiment safely, show results early and often, and measure impact against a place-centered vision and goals.

Authored by: Jennifer S. Vey for The Brookings Institution
Topics: Community development, Low-income, Mobility, Partnerships, Place-based
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 5, 2018

Why we need to invest in transformative placemaking

Publication
Nov 14, 2018
Jennifer S. Vey for The Brookings Institution
In collaboration with Project for Public Spaces (PPS), the National Main Street Center (NMSC), and others, the Bass Center will examine the place needs of people and businesses and use that knowledge to help public, private, and civic sectors leaders develop new approaches to creating and supporting
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Publication
Community:
Dec 5, 2018
The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 provides a new incentive—centered around the deferral, reduction, and elimination of capital gains taxes—to spur private investments in low-income areas designated by states as Opportunity Zones. This provision is based heavily on the Investing in Opportunity Act (S. 1639) introduced by Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Senator Tim Scott (R-SC). Given the significant interest among investors, it is possible that this new tax incentive could attract hundreds of billions of dollars in private capital, making this one of the largest economic development initiatives in U.S. history.

Authored by: Bruce Katz and Ken Gross
Topics: Community development, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Mobility, Place-based
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 5, 2018
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Policy Brief
Community:
Dec 3, 2018
Some seniors and people with disabilities receiving home- and community-based services (HCBS) could lose their Medicaid eligibility and have to go into nursing homes to get needed care if Congress adjourns without extending “spousal impoverishment” protections that are set to expire on December 31.

Authored by: Judith Solomon for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Disabilities, Legislation & Policy, Medicaid / Medicare, Seniors
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 3, 2018

Protections for Married Couples Receiving Medicaid Home- and Community-Based Services End on December 31 Without Congressional Action

Policy Brief
Dec 3, 2018
Judith Solomon for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Some seniors and people with disabilities receiving home- and community-based services (HCBS) could lose their Medicaid eligibility and have to go into nursing homes to get needed care if Congress adjourns without extending “spousal impoverishment” protections that are set to expire on December 31.
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Interactive
Community:
Nov 29, 2018
With political divisions on the rise and global cooperation imperiled, city officials worldwide are stepping up to lead, solving local problems while sharing solutions and innovations across borders. Making cities such as New York, Pittsburgh, and Los Angeles inclusive, safe, and sustainable is vital to the future of the United States—and the globe. Driven by the need to act locally while thinking globally, a growing number of metro areas are adapting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a blueprint for progress.

Authored by: The Brookings Institution
Topics: Community development, Housing, Partnerships, Place-based, Sustainability
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 3, 2018
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Research
Community:
Oct 26, 2018
Some 15% of U.S. households with school-age children do not have a high-speed internet connection at home, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of 2015 U.S. Census Bureau data. New survey findings from the Center also show that some teens are more likely to face digital hurdles when trying to complete their homework.

Authored by: Monica Anderson and Andrew Perrin for Pew Research Center
Topics: Broadband, Education, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 3, 2018
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Report
Community:
Sep 12, 2017
Broadband, especially wireline broadband in American homes, is the essential infrastructure for unlocking the internet’s economic benefits. However, broadband infrastructure is far from ubiquitous, both in terms of where it operates and who subscribes to it, and those deficits are not shared evenly across the country. As such, policymakers must understand how the national digital divide varies depending on the place.

Authored by: Adie Tomer, Elizabeth Kneebone, and Ranjitha Shivaram for The Brookings Institution
Topics: Broadband, Education, Low-income, Mobility, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 3, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Nov 30, 2018
The city and county of Durham, GoTriangle and the Durham Housing Authority are committed to enhancing opportunities for existing low-income families as well as to increasing the production of affordable housing. The light-rail project is critical to the success of these goals, and the success of these goals is critical to the light-rail project.

Authored by: Anthony Scott and John Tallmadge for The Herald Sun
Topics: Community development, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Partnerships, South, Stability, Transportation
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Dec 3, 2018
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News Article
Community:
Nov 30, 2018
Despite their fearsome reputation, a new study finds most low-income housing projects aren't magnets for crime. What makes some more dangerous?

Authored by: Michael Friedrich for CityLab
Topics: Housing, Low-income, Research, Safety
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 30, 2018
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Publication
Community:
Nov 30, 2018
The uninsured rate among children rose in 2017 from 4.7 percent to 5 percent, a new report from Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families finds — the first increase since Georgetown began producing this annual report a decade ago.

Authored by: Jesse Cross-Call for Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Child welfare, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 30, 2018

Children's Uninsured Rate Rises for First Time in a Decade

Publication
Nov 30, 2018
Jesse Cross-Call for Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The uninsured rate among children rose in 2017 from 4.7 percent to 5 percent, a new report from Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families finds — the first increase since Georgetown began producing this annual report a decade ago.
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Policy Brief
Community:
Nov 29, 2018
The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is giving state and local housing agencies more funds to help them carry out a promising new policy to enable families with Housing Choice Vouchers to move to higher-opportunity neighborhoods. Agencies must apply by December 31 to receive the funds.

Authored by: Will Fischer for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Topics: Child welfare, Funding, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Mobility
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 29, 2018

New Funds Will Help Housing Agencies Expand Opportunity for Families with Vouchers

Policy Brief
Nov 29, 2018
Will Fischer for The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is giving state and local housing agencies more funds to help them carry out a promising new policy to enable families with Housing Choice Vouchers to move to higher-opportunity neighborhoods.
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News Article
Community:
Nov 28, 2018
Rock Region Metro has agreed to partner with a coalition of homeless organizations to address what people on the street say is their most vexing barrier to getting a job and, in turn, a home -- access to transportation.

Authored by: Noel Oman for Arkansas Democrat Gazette
Topics: Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, South, Transportation, Workforce development
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 29, 2018

Transit deal to assist homeless in central Arkansas; aim is free rides to work to help get people off streets

News Article
Nov 28, 2018
Noel Oman for Arkansas Democrat Gazette
Rock Region Metro has agreed to partner with a coalition of homeless organizations to address what people on the street say is their most vexing barrier to getting a job and, in turn, a home -- access to transportation.
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Research
Community:
Nov 28, 2018
Public housing residents are more likely than urban residents not living in public housing to have high rates of obesity and smoking and low rates of physical activity. This study assesses whether adding environmental interventions at public housing developments affects residents’ health-related habits and body mass index.

Authored by: BMC Public Health
Topics: Exercise, Health, Housing, Low-income, Obesity, Research
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 29, 2018
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Publication
Community:
Nov 28, 2018
Housing instability among families and children can be detrimental to child welfare, health, economic, and other outcomes. Policymakers and service providers in these fields should consider weaving housing into their approaches. Treating instability at its roots can relieve the trade-offs and stress that emerge when no decent housing is affordable. Evidence indicates that affordable housing can improve a range of outcomes for families and—in combination with short-term or long-term services—help providers tackle complex challenges head-on.

Authored by: Aaron Shroyer for The Urban Institute
Topics: Child welfare, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Stability, Supportive housing
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 29, 2018
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Research
Community:
Nov 9, 2018
The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was first developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 1990 to assess the health risk behaviors of youth and adults in the United States. For the first time since the survey has been widely administered, the 2017 YRBS optional question list included two questions pertaining to homelessness. Using this YRBS data from 17 states (Alaska, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Montana, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wisconsin), we conducted an analysis of differences in seven self-reported risk factors and health outcomes between high school students experiencing homelessness and those not experiencing homelessness. The results were striking and heartbreaking.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Metrics, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 29, 2018

Risk and Resilience: Differences in Risk Factors and Health Outcomes Between Homeless and Non-Homeless Students in 2017 YRBS Data

Research
Nov 9, 2018
SchoolHouse Connection
The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was first developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 1990 to assess the health risk behaviors of youth and adults in the United States.
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Policy Brief
Community:
Mar 26, 2018
This two-page fact sheet summarizes existing data on young children who are homeless and their families, including the impact of homelessness on health, development, early learning, and well-being.

Authored by: SchoolHouse Connection
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 29, 2018
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Webinar
Community:
Oct 15, 2018
Each year, the National Summer Learning Association (NSLA) recognizes the outstanding work done during the summer months on behalf of our nation’s youth. NSLA held a Summer Learning Awards Kick-off Webinar to discuss the 2019 application and answer any questions you might have about the process. We were joined by Lauren Kellner Rudolph, Managing Program Director of Breakthrough Miami, and winner of a 2018 Excellence in Summer Learning Award.

Authored by: National Summer Learning Association
Topics: Education, Low-income, Out-of-school time, Place-based, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Nov 29, 2018