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5th Annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17

Join us for our 5th annual Housing Is Summit on May 16-17, 2019, in Washington, D.C. This unique two-day conference brings together diverse housing, health, and education stakeholders to explore innovative system alignment efforts and develop cross-sector solutions to complex challenges all three sectors face.

Learn More & Register
 

Elements of a Successful Partnership

With generous support from the MacArthur Foundation, CLPHA developed an in-depth report on regional housing-education collaborations taking place at housing authorities across the Pacific-Northwest.

Read the Multimedia Report
 

National Snapshot of PHA-Health Partnerships

The Council of Large Public Housing Authorities (CLPHA) provides new data about public housing authorities’ partnerships with the health sector and offers recommendations to encourage collaboration between these affordable housing providers and their health system partners.

Read the Report
 

Register Now: 2019 Housing Is Summit

CLPHA is pleased to announce that renowned physician, epidemiologist, researcher, and activist Dr. Camara Jones will be a keynote speaker at our fifth annual Housing Is Summit in Washington, D.C., May 16-17. Dr. Jones will present on the need to address social determinants of health to reduce health disparities as well as the interdisciplinary nature of a strong safety net.

Register Today
 
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Report
Community:
Jan 1, 2019
This report is intended to accompany a report entitled The Emerging Crisis of Aged Homelessness: Could Proposed Housing Solutions Be Funded from Avoidance of Excess Hospital and Nursing Home Costs?, which reports on findings from a multi-site study involving the analysis of data from Boston, Los Angeles and New York City. That report is motivated by recent evidence documenting a cohort effect in the single adult homeless population, wherein persons born between 1955 and 1964 have faced a disproportionate risk of homelessness over the past two decades.

Authored by: Thomas Byrne, Daniel Miller, and Jae Quinn for Actionable Intelligence for Social Policy
Topics: Cost effectiveness, East Coast, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 11, 2019

The Emerging Crisis of Aged Homelessness: Could Proposed Housing Solutions Be Funded from Avoidance of Excess Hospital and Nursing Home Costs? Boston Technical Report

Report
Jan 1, 2019
Thomas Byrne, Daniel Miller, and Jae Quinn for Actionable Intelligence for Social Policy
This report is intended to accompany a report entitled The Emerging Crisis of Aged Homelessness: Could Proposed Housing Solutions Be Funded from Avoidance of Excess Hospital and Nursing Home Costs?, which reports on findings from a multi-site study involving the analysis of data from Boston, Los Ang
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Report
Community:
Dec 7, 2018
This report examines health services use and population dynamics among the aging homeless population in Los Angeles. Evidence suggests that adverse health outcomes lead to homelessness, and the conditions related to homelessness lead to or exacerbate a range of health problems

Authored by: Dennis Culhane, Steve Metraux, and Randall Kuhn for Actionable Intelligence for Social Policy
Topics: Health, Homelessness, Housing, Low-income, Research, West Coast
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 11, 2019

A Data-based Re-design of Housing Supports and Services for Aging Adults who Experience Homelessness

Report
Dec 7, 2018
Dennis Culhane, Steve Metraux, and Randall Kuhn for Actionable Intelligence for Social Policy
This report examines health services use and population dynamics among the aging homeless population in Los Angeles. Evidence suggests that adverse health outcomes lead to homelessness, and the conditions related to homelessness lead to or exacerbate a range of health problems
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Publication
Community:
Could Housing Solutions be Funded by Avoidance of Excess Shelter, Hospital, and Nursing Home Costs?

Authored by: Actionable Intelligence for Social Policy
Topics: Cost effectiveness, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 11, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 5, 2019
An Idaho lawsuit concerning how cities across the West enforce laws about sleeping in public—potentially changing how they treat their homeless populations—is now established as precedent. Barring a decision by the Supreme Court to address the case of Martin v. City of Boise, cities will not be able to arrest or punish people for sleeping on public property unless they provide adequate and relatively accessible indoor accommodations.

Authored by: Patrick Sisson for Curbed
Topics: Criminal justice, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 11, 2019
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Video
Community:
Dec 4, 2018
The December 2018 issue of Health Affairs is dedicated to Telehealth, a broad range of technologies used to connect clinicians to each other and to their patients. Distinguished authors examined the broad reach of telehealth and also highlight significant areas of unrealized potential and discussed their findings at a forum at the National Press Club in Washington, DC., on December 4.

Authored by: Health Affairs
Topics: Health, Low-income
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 11, 2019

Telehealth

Video
Dec 4, 2018
Health Affairs
The December 2018 issue of Health Affairs is dedicated to Telehealth, a broad range of technologies used to connect clinicians to each other and to their patients.
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Publication
Community:
Apr 10, 2019
A key challenge for states in ensuring access to care for the 85.3 million Medicaid beneficiaries is having a sufficient number of providers. The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission (MACPAC) recently found that higher Medicaid fees are associated with higher rates of physicians accepting new Medicaid patients. Even so, acceptance of new Medicaid patients differs across specialties.

Authored by: Kayla Holgash and Martha Heberlein for Health Affairs
Topics: Affordable Care Act, Health, Low-income, Medicaid / Medicare
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 11, 2019
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Report
Community:
Apr 1, 2019
With 22 percent of the undergraduate student population comprised of parents, policymakers and institutions must explore the unique needs of this population and address the challenges that may prevent parents from attaining their degree. This includes determining what systems, services, and approaches best support their mental health needs. This brief examines opportunities for policymakers and academic institutions to adapt existing mental health services in order to meet the unique needs of students who are parents and help them complete their degree.

Authored by: Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Mental health, Post-secondary
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 11, 2019

Accelerating Postsecondary Success for Parents: Identifying and Addressing Mental Health Needs

Report
Apr 1, 2019
Ascend: The Aspen Institute
With 22 percent of the undergraduate student population comprised of parents, policymakers and institutions must explore the unique needs of this population and address the challenges that may prevent parents from attaining their degree.
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Report
Community:
Apr 1, 2019
Investments in the postsecondary success of parents with young children can increase attainment of credentials leading to good jobs, bring children the benefits of high-quality learning environments, promote later college-going among children, and improve family economic security across generations. This factsheet provides figures on the student parent population based on the latest National Postsecondary Student Aid Study data.

Authored by: Ascend: The Aspen Institute
Topics: Dual-generation, Early childhood, Post-secondary, Research, Youth
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 11, 2019
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Research
Community:
Jun 18, 2018
The social, economic, and physical environments in which older adults live play a vital role in healthy, active, and engaged lives. But older adults live in unequal environments. Low-income older adults and older racial-ethnic minorities are more likely to live in neighborhoods characterized by poverty, disorder, lack of social cohesion, and pollution. At all income levels there is a greater proportion of older racial-ethnic minorities in neighborhoods with economic, social, and physical problems. Neighborhood inequality may contribute to disparities in the aging experience.

Authored by: Jennifer Ailshire and Catherine Garcia for Generations (also featured by How Housing Matters at The Urban Institute)
Topics: Housing, Low-income, Racial inequalities, Seniors
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 11, 2019

Unequal Places: The Impacts of Socioeconomic and Race/Ethnic Differences in Neighborhoods

Research
Jun 18, 2018
Jennifer Ailshire and Catherine Garcia for Generations (also featured by How Housing Matters at The Urban Institute)
The social, economic, and physical environments in which older adults live play a vital role in healthy, active, and engaged lives. But older adults live in unequal environments.
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Publication
Community:
Apr 10, 2019
Community Land Trusts (CLTs) are nonprofit, community-based organizations that steward land for specific community purposes. They are used to expand and preserve low- and moderate-cost housing, sustain commercial and civic assets, and foster neighborhood engagement through stewardship of the land. Although typically used as an approach for shared equity homeownership, CLTs can also stabilize housing access, increase affordability, revitalize properties in disinvested communities, and enable renters to participate in community governance processes.

Authored by: Kimberly Burrowes for How Housing Matters (Urban Institute)
Topics: Community development, Housing, Low-income
Shared by Mica O'Brien on Apr 11, 2019

Three Ways Community Land Trusts Support Renters

Publication
Apr 10, 2019
Kimberly Burrowes for How Housing Matters (Urban Institute)
Community Land Trusts (CLTs) are nonprofit, community-based organizations that steward land for specific community purposes. They are used to expand and preserve low- and moderate-cost housing, sustain commercial and civic assets, and foster neighborhood engagement through stewardship of the land.
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Webinar
Community:
Apr 10, 2019
Advocacy is everyone's job and it is essential to the children and communities we serve. CLPHA’s Education Working Group hosted a webinar to learn about advocacy efforts to build support and investment in housing. Representatives from Partnership for Children and Youth (PCY) – a California-based advocacy organization that promotes and supports learning opportunities for underserved students – discussed strategies for providing, sustaining, and increasing access to Out-of-School-Time services in housing. PCY also touched on a range of advocacy strategies and preliminary results from the Save After School Campaign in California.

Authored by: CLPHA
Topics: CLPHA, Education, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Out-of-school time, Partnerships, Youth
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 10, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 10, 2019
Senate Democrats, led by Sherrod Brown (OH), Michael Bennet (CO), Dick Durbin (IL), and Ron Wyden (OR), has introduced a new bill that would establish a child allowance for the first time in American history and substantially increase the size of the Earned Income Tax Credit for low-income people.

Authored by: Dylan Matthews for Vox
Topics: Early childhood, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 10, 2019

Senate Democrats have coalesced around a big plan to expand tax credits

News Article
Apr 10, 2019
Dylan Matthews for Vox
Senate Democrats, led by Sherrod Brown (OH), Michael Bennet (CO), Dick Durbin (IL), and Ron Wyden (OR), has introduced a new bill that would establish a child allowance for the first time in American history and substantially increase the size of the Earned Income Tax Credit for low-income people.
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Publication
Community:
Houston children continue to be poisoned by lead even though childhood lead poisoning is considered the most preventable environmental disease among young children. In the past three years, almost 1,200 Houston children between 0 and 72 months old were found to have lead in their blood above the reference value of concern set by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Houston Health Department (HHD) has hosted the Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Program (LBPHCP) for over 25 years, with the goal of providing a lead-safe home environment through home investigations and home lead abatement.

Authored by: Komal Sheth for All In: Data for Community Health
Topics: Early childhood, Health, Housing, Lead, Partnerships, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 8, 2019
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Podcast
Community:
This podcast episode features the work of the Hunterdon County Partnership for Health, a multi-sector coalition that includes over 60 community agencies that share a common interest in improving health in Hunterdon County, NJ. Kim Blanda is a Project Director at Hunterdon Healthcare, Dr. Rose Puelle is a Senior Director of Population Health at Hunterdon Healthcare, and Karen DeMarco is the Director of the Hunterdon County Department of Health. Together, they are working on a project funded by New Jersey Health Initiatives (NJHI) focused on healthier weight as a mechanism for improving community health. The Partnership is addressing obesity-related social determinants of health related to access and transportation, mental health and healthy behaviors.

Authored by: All In: Data for Community Health
Topics: Data sharing, Health, Nutrition, Obesity, Partnerships
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 8, 2019

Bringing Multi-Sector Partners Together to Tackle Obesity in Hunterdon County, NJ

Podcast
All In: Data for Community Health
This podcast episode features the work of the Hunterdon County Partnership for Health, a multi-sector coalition that includes over 60 community agencies that share a common interest in improving health in Hunterdon County, NJ. Kim Blanda is a Project Director at Hunterdon Healthcare, Dr.
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Case study
Community:
The PHNCI Innovation Learning Community grantees spent eighteen months hard at work implementing innovations in their communities. From this community, we have been able to learn what makes an innovation work and be replicable, including leadership buy-in, cross-sector partnerships, and community engagement. In addition to learning about innovation broadly from these grantees, we also want to highlight each grantee’s individual work, including success, challenges, and lessons learned for others who may be interested in replicating their work. The case studies below, produced by NORC at the University of Chicago, are great resources for any agency looking to bring public health innovation to serve the needs of its community.

Authored by: The Public Health National Center for Innovations (PHNCI)
Topics: Data sharing, Health, Partnerships, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 8, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
The Legal Bibliography is collection of 100+ papers, toolkits and other materials focused on privacy, consent and policy documentation. Co-developed by the Network for Public Health Law and Data Across Sectors for Health (DASH), the Bibliography is a growing resource for lawyers and community data practitioners, intended to support local collaboratives in their efforts to share data across sectors.

Authored by: Data Across Sectors for Health (DASH) and Network for Public Health Law (NPHL)
Topics: Criminal justice, Data sharing, Education, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Mental health, Partnerships, Safety
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 8, 2019
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Report
Community:
Apr 8, 2019
While the program has changed very little since its inception, the need for the program has increased. In 1975, the number of program grantees stood at 594. Today, the number of grantees stands at 1,268 as more communities qualify to receive direct program allocations. Based on a CDBG Needs Survey conducted by the CDBG Coalition (and discussed later in this report), CDBG grantees have delayed and canceled projects and reduced or permanently eliminated programs because of a lack of CDBG funds. CDBG is an important investment tool for communities and neighborhoods, but program funding must increase to meet local need to ensure CDBG grantee communities are healthy, vibrant and thriving.

Authored by:
Topics: Community development, Funding, Health, Homelessness, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Partnerships, Research, Safety, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 8, 2019

Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program: Impact and Funding Need

A report of the CDBG Coalition

Report
Apr 8, 2019
While the program has changed very little since its inception, the need for the program has increased. In 1975, the number of program grantees stood at 594. Today, the number of grantees stands at 1,268 as more communities qualify to receive direct program allocations.
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News Article
Community:
Mar 22, 2019
Hundreds of thousands of people 60 years or older in Ohio are struggling to eat simply because they aren't signing up for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.

Authored by: Kevin Barry for News 5 Cleveland
Topics: Food insecurity, Low-income, Nutrition, Seniors
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 8, 2019
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Interactive
Community:
We're creating the foundations of change. Together, we can provide more families with access to a safe place to live.

Authored by: Freddie Mac, Duty to Serve
Topics: Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 8, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 3, 2019
The Department of Housing and Urban Development issued a proposed rule Wednesday to improve its Section 3 Program, which requires funding recipients to employ low-income people and business.

Authored by: Jessica Guerin for Housing Wire
Topics: Asset building, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Low-income, Metrics, Place-based, Workforce development
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 8, 2019
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News Article
Community:
A living wage is an antidepressant. It is a sleep aid. A diet. A stress reliever. It is a contraceptive, preventing teenage pregnancy It prevents premature death. It shields children from neglect.

Authored by: Matthew Desmond for The New York Times Magazine
Topics: Asset building, Legislation & Policy, Low-income
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 26, 2019
More than half of students in the U.S. go to segregated or "racially concentrated" schools, according to the report. Those are schools in which more than three-quarters of students are white, or more than three-quarters are nonwhite. Researchers found that high-poverty districts serving mostly students of color receive about $1,600 less per student than the national average. That's while school districts that are predominately white and poor receive about $130 less.

Authored by: Clare Lombardo for NPR
Topics: Education, Funding, Legislation & Policy, Racial inequalities, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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Research
Community:
Feb 22, 2019
Thoughtfully developed, accessible communities may boost parent engagement and student outcomes in low-income neighborhoods

Authored by: Rachel Sturtz for University of Colorado Denver
Topics: Community development, Education, Family engagement, Housing, Low-income, Partnerships, Racial inequalities, Transportation
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Apr 4, 2019
The nonprofit LIFT Orlando and AdventHealth have started construction on a “first of its kind” early learning center in the long-neglected West Lakes neighborhood south of Camping World Stadium, with an opening expected by August. The center will provide basic education as well as health and wellness programs, an on-site doctor or advanced nurse practitioner, mental health counseling and other services beyond the classroom. It can enroll up to 220 children from age 6 weeks to 5 years, with half of the openings reserved for kids from the West Lakes area, who will be accepted regardless of their families’ ability to pay.

Authored by: Kate Santich for Orland Sentinel
Topics: Child welfare, Early childhood, Education, Health, Low-income, Partnerships, Place-based
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019
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News Article
Community:
Feb 5, 2019
Building more affordable housing units in the metros that are centers of innovation will increase demand for the wares that fill houses, and increase productivity.

Authored by: Richard Floriday for City Lab
Topics: Asset building, Community development, Housing, Legislation & Policy, Research
Shared by Housing Is on Apr 4, 2019